How To Use YouTube To Help Your Small Business Grow? Part 2.

So you’ve decided to dip your toe into the video marketing game and add another string to your internet marketing strategy.

You’ve watched hours of YouTube videos and got a handle on what seems to work and what doesn’t. You’ve targeted your niche market and managed your expectations. What next? What else can your small business do to ensure that it makes the most of its online exposure? Well, it’s quite simple really. What you should be doing is testing the market, paying for the occasional advertisement and tracking that the content you’re sharing is actually working for you.

See, it’s not that difficult is it?

Using You Tube to help build your brand

Make sure you pay attention to comments, and use A/B testing methods and Hot spots.

Most advertising firms will generally try to test their advertisements using some form of focus group. It’s been proven to work, but most small business will probably have neither the time nor the finances to do this. They’ll want to get their videos out there in the public eye as soon as possible. So what should SMBs do? Should they forget the focus group and go with their instincts, or should they try an alternative? Obviously they’ll have to go for the latter and get the opinions not just of their friends and family, but also of their customers. The easiest way of doing this is to use the comments posted below your videos. Granted some of them will be irrelevant, or occasionally obscene, but that’s just human nature. Most are actually informative and helpful. They’ll give some ideas about the direction you should be going in, and suggest ways that will help you to improve the quality of your shared content.

Most large advertising firms also try what’s known as A/B testing. There’s no reason why your small business shouldn’t do this too, but maybe on a smaller scale. Run two versions of your video clip as an unlisted video, preferably backed by search ads, then watch to see which one gets the best response. Go with the clear winner.

You can also try using the online tools that YouTube provides to help you gauge how your video is being received. The best of these tools is Hot Spot. This is an online technology that lets your business see when people are tuning in and out of your video. If users click on your content and immediately click off again, then the chances are it isn’t really hitting the spot. You might have to rethink your video and try something different instead. You can also try using Google Analytics, which will at least tell you how much referral traffic you’re getting from YouTube. Incidentally, it’s worth remembering that statistics show that users clicking on a site following a YouTube link spend more time there than they would if they were referred from another source. So videos are worth the effort.

Try using paid ads.

The chances of your video going viral are slim to say the least, so you may need a little help to promote your content. You can always try buying some paid ads on YouTube: these are advertisements that pop up when users do a YouTube search. Fortunately they’re reasonably priced and come in at around a third of the equivalent AdWords price. You don’t have to spend a fortune on promoted advertisements though. The thing to remember is that you’ll need to make sure the content is relevant to the search term. Google will base the ad’s position on that relevance.

Track the ROI.

If you’re spending money on YouTube ads, you’ll want to know what you’re getting for it. The fact that people have clicked through your ads is great, but if they’re not actually buying anything it will prove to be a waste of time. What you need to do is check to see how your content is shaping up and whether any of the views result in a conversion. The unfortunate thing is the only way you can do this is manually. All any business can do is to improvise and use whatever resources it has at its disposal. Count up the number of YouTube views, track these against traffic that visits your website, and see how many of the customers coming to your site via YouTube actually paid for your products. You can also back this up with customer feedback. Listen to what customers are telling you and find out from them if the video played any part in them doing business with you.

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